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Nearly Half of U.S. Adults Want the COVID-19 Vaccine as Soon as Possible

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Key Takeaways

  • Almost 50% of Americans are increasingly eager to get the COVID-19 vaccine, according to survey results released by the Kaiser Family Foundation COVID-19 Vaccine Monitor.
  • White adults remain more eager to get the vaccine "as soon as possible" compared with Black and Hispanic respondents.
  • Respondents say they would be more likely to get a vaccine if they heard it was "highly effective" in preventing illness from COVID-19 and that the vaccine offers "the quickest way for life to return to normal."

HealthDay News–U.S. adults are increasingly eager to get the COVID-19 vaccine, according to survey results released by the Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) COVID-19 Vaccine Monitor.

The survey was conducted from Nov. 30 to Dec. 8, 2020, and included a nationally representative random-digit dial telephone sample of 1676 adults.

According to the results of the survey, nearly half (47%) of the public want to get the vaccine as soon as they can or have already been vaccinated, which is up from 34% in December. White adults (53%) remain more eager to get the vaccine “as soon as possible” compared with 35% of Black and 42% of Hispanic respondents. Nearly one-third (31%) of respondents say they want to “wait until it has been available for a while to see how it is working for others” before getting it themselves. Black and Hispanic adults are more likely to wait and see than White adults (43%, 37%, and 26%, respectively). One in 5, particularly in rural areas, express reluctance to get vaccinated, including 7% who say they will only get the vaccine if required and 13% who say they will “definitely not” get it. Respondents say they would be more likely to get a vaccine if they heard it was “highly effective” in preventing illness from COVID-19 (57%) and that the vaccine offers “the quickest way for life to return to normal” (54%).

“Perhaps more important than any message is the impact of seeing a neighbor, friend, or family member get their shots without any adverse effects,” KFF President and CEO Drew Altman said in a statement. “It provides hope that vaccine confidence will build over time.”

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